Charlie Carter is known to have lived in three locations in the Snowy Mountains, Ingeegoodbee, Snowy Plain and the Tin Mines. Henry Willis believes the hut was built in the later 1930's.

In 1989 on a field trip with Ross Bolton and Henry Willis both men talked about Charlie and how he would visit the stockmen using Con Bolton's hut on Diggers Creek. Both had seen his hut but were vague about its location. Ross Bolton knew that the hut was located close to a wombat burrow and 30 m from a 'bloody big tree' - .

Over the next few years several attempts were made to locate the hut site without success, until this year when a keen KHA member, Robert Green joined the caretakers of CSIRO and Willis' Botheram Plain hut for a day's searching in December, 2008.

Charlie Carter's Hut Site

This is located on the north side of the saddle between Snowy Plain and the Burrungubugee river and most easily accessed by following Diggers creek up to the western side of the saddle. The hut is approx 2.5m x 4m stone fireplace, and some round logs showing axe shaping. The log diameters are consistent with those shown in a 1940's photo supplied by Henry Willis. Soil from an adjacent wombat burrow was heaped inside the perimeter.

No tins, broken crockery or bottles were found.

A small dam was also found at compass bearing of 340 degrees in a drainage line leading to a sphagnum bog. The wall is stone lined with just the top layer showing above leaf litter filling the dam.

Other Sites

Miners hut site

Located in an open grassy area adjacent to a small creek which runs south from the saddle in which Carters hut site is located. The whole creek has signs of goldworkings. This creek was known to the people of Snowy Plain as the back gully.

Grave

This grave was not known to the group. It is assumed to be of a miner as it is adjacent to the creek and goldworkings. It is unusual in that it has two headstones. Width is approx 800mm by 1700mm with two footstones.

Graham Scully, January 2009

Back Gully - Miner's Hut Stones

Chimney

Chimney Stones and Wombat Hole